audibleecoscience Earth Headphones

Audibleecoscience is a database of podcasts on subjects related to global change biology. It is designed as a resource for the general public and for educators looking to assign "required listening" to their students. Reviews of each podcast and links to the original source have been provided by students taking the IB107 class at the University of Illinois. The database is fully text searchable or you can browse on your favorite subject...
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Animal Life: Aquatic

The Inconvenient Truth About Polar Bears

Media Source: NPR
Program Name: All things considered
Show Name: The Inconvenient Truth About Polar Bears
Broadcast Year: 2013
Original Link: http://www.npr.org/2013/02/02/170779528/the-inconvenient-truth-about-polar-bears

In the podcast by NPR titled “The Inconvenient Truth About Polar Bears”, Zac Unger wanted to write a book about polar bears and the conditions they live in. So he moves with his family to Churchill, Manitoba. His intent was to save the polar bears by writing a book that would make people realize the conditions that polar bears were living in. When he arrives to the small town he was surprised, it was then he realized that the polar bears were not doing so bad. Contrary to people's beliefs polar bears were doing just fine. A few months out of the year there are actually as many polar bears as there are people. The common belief of the people is that polar bears are suffering because the melting of ice and the population has been rapidly decreasing, however there are more polar bears alive today. After the global ban on hunting in 1973 there was a substantial increase in the polar bear population. This is not to say that global warming is not a problem, it just contradicts the common belief that the polar bear population is in immediate danger. In Manitoba when the ice melts in the bay many seek refuge and food in the town, which causes conflict with local human inhabitants. The polar bears don't want to be there, but they need food to live and will later return to the bay when the ice freezes.


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