audibleecoscience Earth Headphones

Audibleecoscience is a database of podcasts on subjects related to global change biology. It is designed as a resource for the general public and for educators looking to assign "required listening" to their students. Reviews of each podcast and links to the original source have been provided by students taking the IB107 class at the University of Illinois. The database is fully text searchable or you can browse on your favorite subject...
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Historic and Paleo-biology

2 August Show

Media Source: Science Magazine
Program Name: Science Podcast
Show Name: 2 August Show
Broadcast Year: 2013
Original Link: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/341/6145/574.2.full

In in the first section of this podcast (1 min 7 secs to 13 mins 47 secs) , Linda Poon interviews Richard Norris on how we can take what we know about past ocean life to help us figure out what will happen to the ocean in the warmer future. Richard Norris talks about how nearly 50 million years ago the earth was warmer than it is today and that there weren’t any polar ice sheets or coral reefs in the ocean. The ocean was so warm that it felt like a hot tub and it was too warm to support larger animals and reefs. Norris also talks about how he uses mean climate states and transient climate states to predict what the future warming has in store for the world. He also compares the Cenozoic era to the present such as how since the ocean was warmer it could not support polar ice sheets and since it was warmer it had less oxygen stored in it which is what is observed today through the usage of fossil fuels. Norris also talks about how the food chain was longer because smaller algae didn’t have enough energy to support bigger animals. He also talks about CO2 being added quickly to the surface ocean that it causes ocean acidification and the surface ocean warms very quickly causing the ocean to become stratified (warm surface, cool below). Norris concludes with describing his models that he had for the future of the ocean.


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